Minutes Matter when you have a heart attack.

When a heart attack occurs, acting fast can minimize damage to the body’s most important muscle.

According to the National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute, of the people who die from heart attacks each year, nearly half die within an hour of the first symptoms- before they reach the hospital. Recognizing the symptoms and seeking emergency medical care immediately can minimize damage to the body’s most important muscle- and could save your life.

In the movies, signs of a heart attack seem straightforward and dramatic. In real life, heart attack symptoms can happen anywhere on your body- not just in your chest. They can vary in intensity and are often different for men and women. It’s important to know what to watch for. If you experience these symptoms and think you are having a heart attack, seek immediate emergency medical help by dialing your ambulance or going to the nearest emergency room.

  • Chest: pressure, aching, burning sensation, shortness of breath, fullness, squeezing or rapid heart rate
  • Arms: heaviness, weakness, aching, numbness, pinching, pain, prickling or discomfort
  • Back: pain, usually between the shoulder blades
  • Shoulders, neck and jaw: aching, pain, prickling or discomfort
  • Abdomen: nausea, pain or indigestion
  • Head: dizziness, anxiety, memory loss, trouble concentrating, lightheadedness or confusion
  • All over: unusual fatigue, sweating, weakness, flu-like symptoms, feeling overheated or sleep disturbances

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If you get an occasional heartburn – which is that burning feeling in the chest within half-hour of eating or that wakes you up at night. Then you may have GERD. Complete the Acid Reflux Risk Assessment to know your risk.

If you feel a painful, burning sensation in your chest 30 minutes to 2 hours after you eat, you may have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Most people get this burning feeling – called heartburn – every now and then. But when you get heartburn often or regularly, you may have GERD.
GERD is also called acid reflux disease. The pain may start in your stomach and move up to the middle of your chest. You may even feel pain in your throat.

GERD is caused when a one-way valve in your food tube (esophagus) doesn’t work as it should. The valve opens when you swallow food or drink and when the food enters the stomach the valve Normally, the valve opens when you swallow food or drink. The valve allows food to enter your stomach, then closes quickly. With GERD, the valve allows food and stomach acid to travel back (reflux) into your esophagus.

Note: A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting a disease. Having a risk factor, or even several risk factors, does not mean you will get the disease. And some people who get GERD may not have had any known risk factors.

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Most adults who drink alcohol are moderate drinkers and are at low risk for alcohol dependence. If you’re concerned about drinking use this tool to find out if you have a problem

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Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women (other than skin cancer). The American Cancer Society reports the breast cancer death rate is declining, probably because of earlier detection and improved treatment. This short assessment will help you determine if you have major risk factors for breast cancer.

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Cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer) usually develops slowly, over several years. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Still, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for the last 15 years because of better detection and treatment. Take this simple assessment to learn about your risks for colorectal cancer.

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Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. Determine your risk for developing CAD using this assessment tool.

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Urinary incontinence means that your urine leaks out at times when you are not using the bathroom. This is a common problem for women of all ages. Learn about the risk factors you may have for UI.

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Lung cancer is a cancer that starts in the lungs. The major cause of lung cancer is smoking cigarettes. Learn about risk factors for lung cancer by taking this short assessment.

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This assessment is valid for women between the ages of 21 and 69 who have had sexual intercourse . Cervical cancer was once one of the most common causes of cancer death among women.

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Osteoporosis is a disease that slowly weakens bones until they break easily. People who have a broken bone related to osteoporosis often experience a downward turn in their overall health

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Too much stress can affect both your emotional and physical health. This assessment will help you identify your life “stressors.”

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The questions in this assessment ask about risk factors—conditions that may put you at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) states that the more risk factors you have, the more likely you are to develop diabetes

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